Daily News Roundup

September 17, 2018

Image: ABC News

Police shoot man armed with knife dead outside Ipswich train station

A 24-year-old man armed with a knife has been shot dead by police at Ipswich train station, west of Brisbane, following a stand-off with officers.

The incident occurred on one of the station’s platform about 4:15pm on Sunday.

Train services remain suspended in Ipswich and buses are replacing the Ipswich and Rosewood train lines between Thomas Street and Bundamba stations.

Ipswich Acting Superintendent Mal Adams said three officers attended the call at the Ipswich train station.

“Upon attending the station they were confronted by a male person. During that confrontation, which was very brief, the male person was shot by police and unfortunately that male person is deceased,” Ms Adams said.

“The incident took place on the train station platform there were a number of witnesses.”

She said the officers were shaken up after the incident.

“We are offering all the support we can to our Police Officers, it’s obviously a traumatic time for them,” she said.

Queensland Police Union (QPU) president Ian Leavers said the officers involved would cooperate fully with an investigation by the Ethical Standards Command.

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Strawberry needle scare spreads to WA as growers suspect a vendetta against the industry

A West Australian strawberry grower says the person responsible for putting sewing needles into punnets must have a vendetta against the industry as the contamination scare spreads nationwide.

The WA Department of Health has warned consumers to check strawberries before eating them, after a needle was found in a punnet of Mal’s Black Label strawberries.

The punnet was purchased from a supermarket in the Adelaide Hills, and it follows several reports of strawberries contaminated by needles on the east coast of Australia.

Mal’s Black Label strawberries are grown and packed in Gingin, 70 kilometres north of Perth.

A company spokesman said he believed there was no way the needle could have got into the punnet at the farm, which has been operating for a long time without incident.

Wanneroo-based strawberry grower Tony Holl said he did not think the Mal’s Black Label punnet was contaminated in WA.

“Somebody’s got a real vendetta, or it’s a terrorism act,” he said on ABC Radio Perth.

“Why would you do a thing to destroy a whole industry Australia-wide? That’s beyond anybody’s belief.

“I mean if you’ve got a vendetta against a farm or something, you damage something on the farm, but this is Australia-wide, virtually.”

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NAB’s Andrew Hagger quits, following ‘fee for no service’ scandal

National Australia Bank senior executive Andrew Hagger has become the latest casualty of the banking royal commission, and will leave the bank after 10 years.

The institution’s former head of wealth had been a key witness in the royal commission.

He was directly criticised during recent hearings forwithholding critical information from regulators about the “fee for no service” scandal.

Mr Hagger acknowledged the reasons for his departure in part of a statement released to the Australian Stock Exchange on Monday morning.

“I take accountability for what has occurred on my watch and accept that alongside successes were failures including instances where we did not act with the pace required,” Mr Hagger said.

“I leave NAB with confidence that we are creating a better bank.”

Mr Hagger’s departure is part of executive leadership changes that NAB chief executive Andrew Thorburn described as a commitment to a “simpler, more customer-focused bank.”

In last month’s hearings into the superannuation sector, the commission was told that NAB had potentially engaged in possible criminal misconduct for charging fees for no service, charging fees to dead customers and putting commissions ahead of shareholder interests.

Mr Hagger was criticised for not alerting the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) to possible criminal breaches when they became apparent.

“In its representations to ASIC throughout negotiations in respect of the plan service fees,NAB acted in a way that departed from community standards and expectations,” according to closing submissions, filed in August by counsel assisting the commission.

“Mr Hagger’s evidence that he ‘left the door open’ for ASIC to ask the question reveals both a disrespect for the role of the regulator and a disregard for the gravity of the events in question.

This daily news roundup is curated with sources from ABC News.

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